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Course outline :

General Information

Course Title : Pakistan Studies for Foreign Students (Alternate Course to HS-105)
Code : HS-127
Year : First Year
Teaching Hours : 2+0 (Contact Hours 3) 
Pre-requisite :  
Marks/Distribution

100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objectives of the Course

  • To acquaint students with the history, geography and politics of Pakistan
  • To provide them basic knowledge regarding problems and issues confronting Pakistan
  • To develop their interest in Pakistan as a moderate Muslim state

Course Contents

Chapter 1 – Land of Pakistan
  • Land & People – Physical features and demography
  • Geographical and strategic importance of Pakistan
  • Natural resources – Mineral, water, and power
  • Natural Landscape
  • Environmental issues in Pakistan
  • Cultural heritage: important remnants of ancient civilizations in Pakistan

Chapter 2 – Creation of Pakistan

  • A brief Historical survey of Muslim community in the sub-continent
  • Two-Nation theory – its origin &  development
  • Rationale for Pakistan – Factors leading to the demand of Pakistan
  • Emergence of Pakistan
  • Role of Quaid-e-Azam the struggle for Pakistan            

Chapter 3 - Government & Politics in Pakistan

  • Political History of Pakistan – A brief account (1947 to date)
  • Constitution of Pakistan 1973 – Salient features
  • Governmental structure – Federal, Provincial and Local
 
Chapter 4 – Pakistan in the Community of Nations
  • An overview of Pakistan’s foreign policy
  • Relations of Pakistan with neighbors, Super Powers, and the Muslim World  

Chapter 5 – Pakistan’s Stand Point on Human Rights

    • Constitutional provisions
    • Comparative analysis of Western and Islamic perspective of Human Rights
    • Pakistan’s Stand on national and international level

Recommended Books

  • M. Ikram Rabbani, Pakistan Affairs, (8th Ed.), 2005, Carvan Enterprises
  • Victoria Schofield, Old Roads - New Highways 50 years of Pakistan, 1997, Oxford           University Press

 

General Information

Course Title : Organizational Behaviour
Code : HS-405
Year : Fourth Year
Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)  
Pre-requisite :  
Marks/Distribution

100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objective of the Course

  • The course aims at creating awareness about human behavior in organizations at the individual and group levels in order to enable them to use the concepts and methods of organizational behavior for enhancing their performance as members of organizations
  • The course helps them in realizing how organizational behavior affects organizational performance by drawing their attention towards concepts like personality, motivation, leadership, decision making etc.
  • The course participants can theoretically and practically understand the different dimensions of an organization viz. structure and design, culture, communication and work ethics, individual and team behavior.

Course Contents
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour

  • Foundations of OB: Management functions, roles, and skills
  • Effective versus successful managerial activities
  • Replacing intuition with systematic study
  • Exploring OB challenges and opportunities facing globalization: Improving quality and productivity
  • Improving people skills
  • Managing work force diversity
  • Responding to globalization
  • Empowering people
  • Stimulating innovation and change
  • Coping with temporariness
  • Handling declining employee loyalty
  • Improving ethical behavior

Foundations of Individual Behaviour

  • Individuals & Organizations: Biographical traits and ability
  • Personality
  • Perceptions and individual decision making: Understanding perception and its significance, factors influencing perception
  • Linking perception and individual decision making
  • Optimizing decision making model
  • Alternative decision making models
  • Issues in decision making
  • Values, attitudes and job satisfaction: Importance, sources, types  of values
  • Sources and types of attitude
  • Attitude and consistency
  • Measuring job satisfaction
  • Determinants of job satisfaction
  • Effect of job satisfaction on employee performance
  • Ways employees can express dissatisfaction 
  • Motivation - basic concepts and applications

Foundations of Group Behaviour

  • Group in OB: Defining and classifying groups
  • Stages of group development, work group behaviour
  • Dynamics of groups
  • Understanding work teams: Team versus group; types of teams, creating high performance teams
  • Turning individuals into team players
  • Communication: communicating at interpersonal and organizational level
  • Leadership: basic approaches and contemporary issues
  • Conflict & negotiation: defining conflict; transition in conflict thought
  • Conflict process
  • Negotiation - strategies, process and issues

Foundations of Organizational Structure

  • Organizational structure and design
  • Work design
  • Work stress
  • Organizational culture: definition
  • Culture’s functions, employees and organizational culture
  • Organization change and development: forces for change
  • Managing planned change, resistance to change
  • Approaches to managing organizational change

Recommended Books

  1. Stephen P. Robins, Timothy A Judge, & Seema Sanghi, Organizational Behaviour,            (12th Ed.), 2006, Pearson Education
  2. John W. Newstrom & Keith Davis, Organizational Behaviour, (11th Ed.), 2002,     McGraw Hill Companies
  3. Fred Luthans, Organizational Behavior, (10th Ed.), 2004, McGraw-Hill Irwin

 

General Information

Course Title : Oral Communication
Code : HS-201
Year : Second Year
Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)     
Pre-requisite :  
Marks/Distribution

100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objective of the Course

  • This course aims at working on the oral and speech communication skills of students in the target language, English. It provides the theoretical framework which governs all spoken situations be that formal or informal, individual or collective.
  • This theoretical base creates the needed impetus for the individuals to undertake oral communication more effectively.
  • The course focuses oral communication through personal as well as small group interactions, discussions, public speaking and technical presentations.
  • Different strategies of interpersonal communication and presentation techniques are used to acquaint individuals with the essential skills needed in the academic and professional settings.

Course Contents
Foundations for Oral Communication

  • Introduction to communication
  • Model of communication competence
  • Perception
  • Language and nonverbal communication
  • Listening

Interpersonal Communication

  • Introducing IPC and its assumptions
  • Challenges, Principles and ethics of IPC
  • Interpersonal relationships and skills

Conversation

  • Process, Management and Problems
  • Interpersonal conflict
  • Pair discussion / debate

Small Group Communication

  • Need and significance of small group communication
  • Challenges and coping strategies in small group competence
  • Decision making, Leadership and managing relationships in small groups
  • Group discussion practice

Public Speaking and Technical Presentations

  • Introduction to public speaking
  • Realizing speaking types (speaking to inform, explain to persuade)
  • Understanding speech preparation (process and model, purpose and thesis, gathering support materials, organizing and outlining, and developing visual aids)
  • Delivering speech effectively (eloquence, voice and articulation, nonverbal cues, and avoiding pitfalls)
  • Practice in speech and technical presentations

Interviewing

  • Types of interviews and process
  • Considerations and skills during interviews
  • Preparing for effective interviewing
  • Simulating employment interviewing

Recommended Books

  1. Joseph A. Devito, Human Communication, (8th Ed.), 2000, Longman
  2. Michael S. Hanna, Communicating in Business & Professional Settings, (4th Ed.),   1997, McGraw Hill
  3. Andrew Leigh, Michael Maynard, The Perfect Presentation, 2003, Random House
  4. Sherwyn P. Morreale, Brains H. Spitzberg & J. Kevin Barge, Human Communication:      Motivation, Knowledge & Skills, (2nd Ed.), 2006, Wadsworth, Thomson Learning, USA
  5. Mary Allen Guffy, Process & Product Approach to Business Communication, (7th             Ed.), 2010, Thomson Publishers
  6. Courtland L. Bovee & John V. Thill, Business Communication Today, (8th Ed.), 2008,       Prentice Hall International Inc

 

General Information

Course Title : Logic & Critical Thinking
Code : HS-311
Year : Third Year
Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)  
Pre-requisite :  
Marks/Distribution

100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objective of the Course

  • This course is an introduction both to logic and critical thinking for students with no previous exposure in these subjects.
  • The course focuses the principles of good reasoning and covers pretty much the same subject as what is usually taught in practical logic, informal reasoning or the study of argumentation.
  • The course acquaints the students to the process of thinking and the concept and application of logic. An important concern of this course is to help individuals think critically and to guide them to think more clearly, insightfully and effectively; and to enable them to guard against the pitfalls and fallacies of thinking.
  • Concrete examples from the contemporary life, experiences, issues facilitate students in efficient problem solving, improved perceptions and sound understanding in their academic, career and personal lives.
  • The basic aim of this course is to create awareness about the thinking process which is based on the premise that the study of logic can help develop and improve thinking.
  • The course focuses on enabling students to distinguish good reasoning from bad.
  • Developing and expanding students’ thinking implies their personal transformation and also of the perspective from which they view the world around them.
  • Also, to critically reflect on the concepts and values they use to guide their choices and the consequences these choices bring in.
  • The purpose of this course is to make individuals more skilled in everyday reasoning like to think things through to reach logical conclusions, to distinguish strong and weak arguments, to determine the value of claims, opinions and perceptions, to figure out what to believe or not to believe based on the critical examination of available.

Course Contents
Introduction to the Study of Logic & the Basic Terminology

  • Defining logic and the benefits of studying logic
  • Concepts, Propositions, Interferences
  • Arguments, Structure of arguments, Arguments in context
  • Unstated propositions  
  • Premise & conclusion  

Thinking   

  • Definition, Benefits of successful thinking   

Thinking process in three areas of life

  • Working towards goals   
  • Making decisions and analyzing issues
  • Relationship between thinking and goals
  • Classification of goals
  • Identifying appropriate goals
  • Poor decisions
  • Making good career decision
  • Deciding on an appropriate career
  • Creating career portrait
  • Creating your dream job
  • Discovering one’s self by identifying one’s interest
  • Abilities and values
  • Defining effective thinker
  • Analyzing issues a symbol of effective thinker
  • Considerations in analyzing issues
  • Thinking tools and their applications (e.g. PMI, STAR method, Shewhart Cycle, Socratic Method, RW & D, etc.)  

Thinking Critically

  • Differentiating between thinking, Critical thinking and Creative thinking
  • Understanding critical thinking and its impact

Critical Thinking Approach

  • Thinking actively (influences on our thinking)  
  • Exploring situation with five types of questions  
  • Thinking for ourselves evaluating our evidences and their types
  • Viewing situations from different perspectives
  • Discussing ideas in an organized way    

Problem Solving

  • Understanding what a problem is?
  • General attitudes towards problems
  • Desired attitudes towards problems
  • Problem solving process

Perceiving

  • Defining perception
  • Perceptions a prominent trait of successful people  
  • Critical thinking and perception  
  • Evaluating the differences in perception (through tests, optical illusions etc.)
  • Perception processes
  • Factors governing perception
  • Difficulties / errors in perception process

Believing and Knowing

  • From perceiving to believing and knowing
  • Differentiating between believing and knowing
  • Defining values and the 4m value system
  • Identifying one’s values in life
  • Defining beliefs
  • Belief as interpretation
  • Evaluation, Conclusion
  • Prediction and endorsement
  • Accuracy scale for evaluating thoughts
  • Thinking patterns and organizing concepts
  • Diagrammatic representation of the pattern for organizing thoughts

Three Ways to Organize Thoughts

  • Chronological and process relationships
  • Comparative and analogical relationships
  • Casual relationships

Types of Casual Relationship

  • Casual chains
  • Contributory causes and interactive causes

Reasoning

  • Deductive and inductive reasoning

Deduction

  • Syllogism
  • Linear ordering
  • Tree diagrams

Forms of Inductive Reasoning

  • Empirical generalizations
  • Casual reasoning
  • Evaluating deductive and inductive arguments
  • The significant method
  • Problems to inductive reasoning

Fallacies

  • Definition
  • Purpose and classification

Fallacies of False Generalizations   

  • Hasty generalization
  • Sweeping generalization and false dilemma

Casual Fallacies

  • Questionable cause
  • Misidentification of the cause
  • Post hoc ergo propter hoc
  • Slippery slope

Recommended Books

  1. John Chaffee, Thinking Critically, (4th Ed.), 1994, Houghton Mifflin Company
  2. Irving M. Copi & Carl Cohen, Introduction to Logic, (12th Ed.), 2005, Prentice Hall   
  3. Diane F. Halpern, Thought & Knowledge, (4th Ed.), 2003, Lawrence Erlbaum         Associates, Publishers
  4. Leo A Groarke, Cristopher W. Tindale & Linda Fisher, Good Reasoning Matter, (2nd         Ed.), 2008, Oxford University Press
  5. Greg Bassham, William Irwin, Carl, Henry Nardone, James M. Wallace, Critical    Thinking, (2nd Ed.), 2004, McGraw Hill, Boston, Toronto

 




General Information

Course Title : Functional English
Code : HS-111
Year : First Year (Urban & Infrastructure Engineering)
Teaching Hours :

2(Contact Hours 3)

  
Pre-requisite : -
Marks/Distribution

Total 100 marks (70+30)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objectives of the Course
• The course aims at improving the four language skills –listening, speaking, reading and writing.
• The functional aspect of language will be stressed further through development of students’ vocabulary and use of grammar.

Contents
Speaking and Listening
• Listening actively through the use of skills and sub skills, and in a variety of situations.
• Speaking: Fluency and confidence building through group discussions, role plays and public speaking.

Vocabulary development
• Tips / strategies in vocabulary enhancement
• Practice in vocabulary development

Reading
• Reading skills, Sub skills
• Reading strategies
• Reading practice through variety of reading texts and comprehension exercises
• Précis writing

Writing
• Note taking: Techniques for taking notes from lectures, from books ( integrated with listening & reading)
• Process of Writing with practice in pre writing strategies, in revising, and in, editing for grammar.
• Writing well- structured and effective paragraphs, essays and letters (routine communication) using proper writing mechanics. Writing descriptions, narrations, cause and effect, compare and contrast etc.

Recommended Books
1. Michael Mcarthy & Felicity O’Dell, English Vocabulary in Use (upper intermediate), Cambridge University Press, 2008
2. Carole Robinson & Helen Parker, Themes for Listening and Speaking Teacher’s, (2nd Ed.), Oxford University Press, 1986
3. Glendining & Holmstrom, Study Reading, (2nd Ed.), Cambridge University Press, 2007
4. Frank Smith, Writing and the Writer, Heinemann Educational Books, 1994

 




General Information

Course Title : Pakistan Studies  
Code : HS-106
Year : First Year (Urban & Infrastructure Engineering)
Teaching Hours : 1 (Contact Hours 2) 
Pre-requisite : -
Marks/Distribution

Total 100 marks (70+30)

           

 

 

 

 

 

Objectives of the Course

  • To provide an overview regarding the historical ideological perspectives on Pakistan Movement, and with the land, government, and constitution.
  • To create awareness regarding the contemporary issues facing Pakistan Study the process of governance, national development, issues arising in the modern age and posing challenges to Pakistan.

Contents
Historical and ideological perspective of Pakistan Movement

  • Two Nation Theory: Claim of Muslims of being a separate nation from Hindus, based upon cultural diversity. Cultural diversity and interests as bases for the demand of Pakistan – Lahore resolution.
  • Creation of Pakistan: Factors leading to the creation of Pakistan. Quaid-e-Azam and the demand of Pakistan.

Constitutional Process

  • Constitutional and Political developments in Pakistan 1947-1973. Salient features of the Constitutions 1956, 1962 and 1973 and amendments.

Land of Pakistan

  • Geo-physical conditions. Geo-political and strategic importance of Pakistan. Natural resource, viz: mineral, water and power.

Contemporary issues in Pakistan

  • A brief survey of Pakistan Economy: problems, issues and future prospects.
  • Pakistani Society and Culture-Broad features with emphasis on youth role in the development of Pakistan
  • Literacy and education in Pakistan: problems and issues. State of Science and Technology in Pakistan: A comparison with other countries with special reference to the Muslim world
  • Environmental issues in Pakistan: government policies and measures and suggestions for improvement.
  • Urbanization in Pakistan - problems and issues
  • Pakistan’s role in the preservation of nature through international conventions / treaties.
  • Human Rights in Pakistan: Pakistan’s response to human rights issues at national & international levels.
  • Pakistan’s Foreign Policy

Recommended Books

    • Khalid W. Bajwa, Urban Pakistan: Frames for Imagining & Reading Urbanism, Oxford University Press, 2013
    • Rafi Raza, Pakistan in Perspective 1947-1997, Oxford University   Press, 2003

     



    General Information

    Course Title : Functional English
    Code : HS-103
    Year : First Year (Automotive & Marine, Polymer & Petrochemical, Construction, and Optical Engineering)
    Teaching Hours : 3 (Th=2+ Pr=1) (Contact Hours Th=2+ Pr=2)    
    Pre-requisite : HS-104
    Marks/Distribution

    Total 150 marks [100 Theory (70+30), Practical 50]

               

     

     

     

     

     

    Objectives of the Course

    • To create awareness amongst the students of the importance of the English language in today’s world.
    • To enable students to understand and communicate fluently in both oral and written English.
    • To equip the students with study skills as well as language skills which will facilitate them in their studies and help them in becoming good professionals.
    • To reinforce students’ language skills through practice

     

    Contents

    • Study Skills (sessional tests only):
    • Reading, dictionary, library skills 
    • Speed reading
    • Writing outlines
    • Note taking 

     

    • Oral Communication (sessional tests only):
    • Confidence building 
    • Class discussions
    • Speeches
    • Verbal interaction

     

    • Advanced reading comprehension:

    Using texts dealing with science, literature and human rights (as per HEC recommendation).

     

    4) Précis writing:

    • Rules of précis writing
    • Practice précis.

     

    5) Controlled & guided writing:

    • Pre writing strategies (planning, information gathering, preparing to write)
    • Writing
    • Search for topic sentences
    • Developing a theme
    • Following up ideas and arguments
    • Outline plans etc.

     

    6) Essay writing:

    • Types of writing – narrative, descriptive, expository, argumentative etc.
    • Using guided writing to organize essays including human rights as essay topic (as per HEC recommendation).

     

    7) Writing short reports:

    • Short background of report and its importance
    • Memo report
    • Brief reports on events seen / experienced like visit to an exhibition etc. 

     

    8) Letter writing:

    • Format and layout
    • Formal letters
    • Types of letters – invitations (acceptance and refusals), condolence, thanks, congratulations, to the editor, chairman class advisor, dean, vice chancellor etc.

     

    9) Applied Grammar:

    • Morphology
    • Types of sentences
    • Sentence analysis
    • Tenses
    • Jumbled sentences           
    • Question tags
    • Homonyms and homophones and their use in sentences 
    • Punctuation – sentences and paragraphs
    • Use of idioms

     

    10) Practical Workbook (50 marks)

     

    Teaching Methodology:

    • Lectures, Reading and Writing activities; Discussions, Speaking activities like speeches and student-to-student interaction.

    Handouts (from teachers)

     

    Recommended Texts for the Book Bank

    • Hooper J.S. A Quick English Reference , Oxford University Press  
    • Eastwood J. Oxford Practice Grammar , Oxford University Press
    • Langan, J., College Writing, McGraw Hill

     

    Reference Books / Magazines / Articles

    • Wallace, Study Skills in English, Cambridge University Press
    • Yorkey, Study Skills , McGraw Hill
    • Gartside, Business Correspondence , Pitman
    • Thomson & Martinet, College English Grammar , Oxford University Press
    • Murphy, Effective Business Communication, McGraw Hill
    • Lou Mary, Technical Communication, Irwin
    • Oshima Alice, Writing Academic English, Addison Wesley
    • Thoburn, McMillan English, McMillan
      • Aaron, Jane, The Little Brown Compact Handbook, Longman

       

       


      General Information

      Course Title : Functional English
      Code : HS-114
      Year : First Year
      Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)  
      Pre-requisite : HS-104
      Marks/Distribution

      100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                 

       

       

       

       

       

      Objective of the Course

      • The course aims at strengthening the four English Language skills [listening, reading speaking and writing] in order for the students to use language effectively.
      • The course contents and the practice related with vocabulary development and grammar will facilitate proficiency in English Language as well as demonstrating each skill

      Course Contents
      Listening

      • Types of Listening (content, critical, selective, active, reflective, empathic etc.)
      • Problems in listening and coping strategies
      • Listening skills and sub skills
      • Practice in Listening

      Vocabulary Development

      • Words easily confused, compound words, prefixes and suffixes
      • Forming adjectives, descriptive adjectives (personalities)
      • Using synonyms and Antonyms, homophones
      • Use of idioms in current language
      • Exposure and practice to develop everyday vocabulary for formal and informal situations

      Reading

      • Skimming, scanning, predicting, and anticipating
      • Guessing meanings of unfamiliar words from the context
      • Reading strategies
      • Reading practice through variety of reading texts and comprehension exercises
      • Beyond reading [speaking and writing outputs)

      Writing

      • Making notes
      • Social formal letters (elements, style, formatting, organization and structure, types e.g. requests, invitation, thank you, condolence etc)
      • Short reports (structure, format, and types i.e. informational, event and analytical)

      Grammar

      • Tenses
      • Frequency, time and quantity expressions
      • Punctuation
      • Conditional Sentences
      • Active and passive
      • Semantic markers
      • Phrasal Verbs

      Speaking

      • Giving a presentation
      • Discussion
      • Beginning a discussion
      • Entering a discussion (at a subsequent stage)
      • Interrupting a discussion without giving offence
      • Changing your stance / point of view in the course of a discussion
      • Summing up a discussion
      • Role play / dialogue (e.g. interviewing: with respect to social interaction)

      Recommended Books

        • Andriod Doff, Christopher Jones, Language in Use: Pre-Intermediate Classroom Book,           2000, Cambridge University Press
        • Andriod Doff, Christopher Jones, Language in Use: Intermediate Classroom Book, 2010,        Cambridge University Press
        • John Eastwood, Oxford Practice Grammar, 1999, Oxford University Press
        • Pauline Cullen, Cambridge Vocabulary for IELTS, 2008, Cambridge University Press
        • Michael McCarthy & Felicity O’Dell, English Vocabulary in Use: Upper-Intermediate,             2008, Cambridge University Press
        • Lynch, Study Listening, (2nd Ed.), 2007, Cambridge University Press
        • Carole Robinson and Helen Parker, Themes for Listening and Speaking Teacher’s, (2nd Ed.), 1986, Oxford university Press

         


        General Information

        Course Title : Functional English
        Code : HS-104
        Year : First Year
        Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 4)
        Pre-requisite :  
        Marks/Distribution

        100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                   

         

         

         

         

         

        Objective of the Course

        • The course aims at strengthening the language skills in order for the students to use language effectively as a tool to succeed in academic activities which they will be carrying out as part of their academic activities.
        • The course enhances the development of all the four language skills but explicitly focuses on listening, reading and writing; and the efforts made in these areas are perceived to implicitly target proficiency and accuracy in the target language, English. The language skills are coincided with study skills which are directly required by students as basic skills to pursue other subjects more meaningfully.

        Course Contents

        1. Listening
        • Types of Listening
        • Problems in listening and coping strategies
        • Listening skills, Sub skills
        • Practice in Listening
        1. Note taking
        • Techniques for taking notes (from lectures, from books)
        • Note taking in different forms paragraphs (points, figures, processes, tables, graphs etc.)

         

        1. Vocabulary development
        • Enhancing current vocabulary to reflect a better usage of words in spoken and written language
        • Tips / strategies in vocabulary enhancement
        • Practice in vocabulary development
        1. Reading
        • Reading skills, Sub skills
        • Reading comprehension levels
        • Reading strategies
        • Reading practice through variety of reading texts and comprehension exercises
        • Beyond reading [outline, précis, speech and presentation]

         

        1. Writing
        • Process of Writing
        • Informal Writing strategies
        1. Writing Correctly
        1. Sentence structure and punctuation
        2. Error correction

         

        1. Paragraphs
        1. Structure
        2. Types
        3. Topic and the topic sentence
        4. Unity
        5. Adequate development and coherence in paragraphs
        1. Essays
        1. Types
        2. Five paragraphs, long essays
        3. Structure (thesis statement and the paragraphs)

         

        1. Short Reports
        1. Structure
        2. Format and types (informational and analytical)
        1. Letters
        1. Elements, Styles
        2. Formatting (digital letter writing)
        3. Organization and structure of the letter
        4. Types (Routine requests and intimation, invitation, thank you and condolence letters etc.)

         

        Recommended Books

        1. Pauline Cullen, Cambridge Vocabulary for IELTS,  2008, Cambridge University    Press
        2. Michael Mcarthy & Felicity O’Dell, English Vocabulary in Use (upper intermediate),         2008, Cambridge University Press
        3. Academic Listening Encounters: Human Behaviour, 2004, Cambridge University   Press
        4. Lynch, Study Listening, (2nd Ed), 2007, Cambridge University Press
        5. Carole Robinson & Helen Parker, Themes for Listening and Speaking Teacher’s, (2nd         Ed.), 1986, Oxford University Press
        6. Kenneth J Pakenham, Making Connections: A Strategic Approach to Academic      Reading, (2nd Ed), 2004, Cambridge University Press
        7. Glendining & Holmstrom, Study Reading, (2nd Ed.), 2007, Cambridge University   Press
        8. Frank Smith, Writing and the Writer, 1994, Heinemann Educational Books
        9. Peter Dow Adams, Connections: A Guide to Basics of Writing, 1987, Little Brown &        Company
        10. John Langan, College Writing Skills, (5th Ed.), 1984, Irwin McGraw Hill
        11. Edmond H Weiss, The Elements of International Style: A Guide to Writing Correspondence, Reports, Technical Documents, and Internet Pages for a         Global Audience, 2005, Prentice Hall, India

         



        General Information

        Course Title : Entrepreneurship
        Code : HS-403
        Year : Fourth Year
        Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 4) 
        Pre-requisite :  
        Marks/Distribution

        100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                   

         

         

         

         

         

        Contents

        • Understanding the Entrepreneurship Mind-set
        • The revolution impact of Entrepreneurship
        • The individual Entrepreneurship Mind-set
        • Corporate Entrepreneurship Mind-set
        • The Social and Ethical perspectives of Entrepreneurship
        • Launching Entrepreneurship Ventures
        • Creativity and innovations
        • Methods to initiate ventures
        • Legal challenges in Entrepreneurship
        • The search for Entrepreneurship Capital

         

        • Formulation of Entrepreneurship Plan
        • The assessment of function with opportunities
        • The marketing aspects of new ventures
        • Financial statements in new ventures
        • Business plan preparation for new ventures
        • Strategic Perspectives in Entrepreneurship
        • Strategies growth in Entrepreneurship
        • Valuation challenges in Entrepreneurship
        • Final harvest of a new venture

         

        Teaching Methodology

        • Lectures: Interspersed with interactive sessions in class
        • Practical work: Spoken language, pronunciation, accent reduction, discussion etc.

        Recommended Books 

          • Donald F., Kuratko, Introduction to Entrepreneurship, (8th Ed.), 2009, South Wetern         College 
          • Rita G. McGrath, & Ian C. McMillan, The Entrepreneurial Mind-Set, 2000, Harvard          Business School Press
          • Jerry Kaplan, Startup: A Silicon Valley Adventure, 2001, Replica Books
          • Rob Adams, A Good Hard Kick in the Ass: Basic Training for Entrepreneurs, 2002,          Crown Business
          • Thomas, H., Byers, Richard C., Dorf, & Andrew J., Nelson, Technology Ventures: From Ideas to Enterprise, (3rd Ed.), 2010, McGraw Hill

           



          General Information

          Course Title : Business & Organization Communication
          Code : HS-301
          Year : Third Year
          Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)
          Pre-requisite :  
          Marks/Distribution

          100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                     

           

           

           

           

           

          Objective of the Course

          • The basic aim of this course is to develop awareness of the arts and skills necessary to facilitate effective communication within the business and organizational settings undertaken by a professional.
          • Various forms of written and digital communication are focused with emphasis on combining the theoretical framework with the real world applications.
          • Awareness about the basic principles, channels, process, and norms of formal communication better prepares an individual to plan and undertake communications which ultimately enhance the professional image and the work performance.
          • The course equips students with the knowledge and skills to plan employment communications, official correspondence, emails, proposals and reports that are necessary features of today’s workplace and careers.

          Course Contents
          Business Communication Foundations

          • Definition of Business, Organization & communication
          • Goals, Patterns, Principles, Channels, Tools, Levels, & Qualities (7 C’s) Process of communication
          • Forms & functions of organizational communication
          • Communication barriers
          • Feedback and its types
          • Listening and understanding nonverbal communication
          • International and cross cultural communication

          Communication technologies and techniques  

          • Tools for digital communication
          • Etiquettes and ethics of using communication technologies

          Communicating in Teams

          • Improving your performance in teams (team communication, group dynamics, etiquette in team  settings)  
          • Making your meetings more productive (preparing for meetings, leading and participating in meetings
          • Meeting notice, Agenda and Minutes
          • Meeting simulation  

          Business Writing

          • Planning audience centered business messages and applying the three step writing process
          • Letter and memos (structure and elements)
          • Practice in writing letters and memos

          Three Types of Business Messages and Situations

          • Routine / neutral / positive / good news and goodwill messages  
          • Negative / bad news messages
          • Persuasive messages

          Employment Communication

          • Resume / CV
          • Job application (solicited and unsolicited)

             
          Writing Proposals and Reports

          • Finding and communicating information
          • Communicating information through visuals
          • Writing effective proposals
          • Short reports (analytical and information reports, memo and letter reports)
          • Formal reports (structure and organization)  

          Recommended Books

          1. Courtland L. Bovee & John V. Thill, Business Communication Today, (8th Ed.), 2008,       Prentice Hall International Inc
          2. Mary Allen Guffy, Process & Product Approach to Business Communication, (7th             Ed.), 2010, Thomson Publishers  
          3. Kitty O’ Locker, Business & Administrative Communication, (10th Ed.), 2012, Irwin          McGraw Hill
          4. Lesikar Flately, Basic Business Communication: Skills for Empowering the Internet            Generation, (9th Ed.), 2002, Irwin McGraw Hill
          5. AC Buddy Kirzan, Patricia Merrier, Carol Larson Jones, Jules Harcourt, Business Communication, (6th Ed.), 2004, International Thomson Publishers

           

          General Information

          Course Title : Academic Writing
          Code : HS-214
          Year : Second Year
          Teaching Hours : 3+0 (Contact Hours 3)     
          Pre-requisite :  
          Marks/Distribution

          100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                     

           

           

           

           

           

          Objective of the Course

          • To enable students to understand and practice writing as a process
          • To enable students to develop organized and coherent writing output
          • To help students develop critical reading and writing skills

          Course Contents
          Writing Process

          • Identifying topic area, narrowing topic, planning, brainstorming, mind mapping, outlining, writing first draft, reviewing, revising, proofreading, writing final draft

          Reading & Writing

          • Analyzing different texts: identifying point of views, claims, assumptions, differentiate facts from opinions
          • Practicing Academic Language: differentiate using language of opinion and fact
          • Synthesize information, developing critical write up with relevant factual information, personal views, academic evidence, examples, cause and effect etc.
          • Presenting and describing visuals (tables & graphs)
          • Avoiding plagiarism and ensuring originality: summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting sources, citing, documenting sources through a referencing system (MLA / APA / Harvard style, as suggested by the discipline)

          Writing products

          • Writing a well-structured paragraph (topic sentence, supporting details, conclusion)
          • Writing narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumentative essays
          • Developing an effective essay using thesis statement, adequate development and argument, supporting details, and conclusion
          • Writing short reports (technical reports)

          Recommended Books

            • Hamp-Lyon, L., & Heasley, B., Study Writing: A Course in Writing Skills for          Academic Purposes, (2nd Ed.), 2006, Cambridge
            • Leki, I., Academic Writing: Exploring Processes and Strategies, (2nd Ed.), 2012,     Cambridge
            • Arlov, P., Wordsmith: A Guide to College Writing, (4th Ed.), 2010, Prentice Hall
            • Mattix-Dietsch, B., Reasoning &Writing Well: A Rhetoric, Research Guide, and     Handbook, (4th Ed.), 2006, McGraw-Hill

             



            General Information

            Course Title : English
            Code : H.S – 101 / HS 102 for FCIT.
            Year : First Year
            Teaching Hours : 3-Credits / Semester          
            Pre-requisite :  
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

                       

             

             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course.

            • To create an awareness amongst the students of the importance of the English language in today’s world.
            • To enable students to understand and communicate fluently in both oral and written English language.
            • To equip the students with study skills as well as language skills which will facilitate them in their studies and help them becoming good professionals

            Contents.

            1)       Study Skills (sessional tests only):

            a)       Reading, dictionary, library skills 

            b)       speed reading

            c)        writing outlines

            d)        note taking 

            2)       Oral communication (sessional tests only):

            a)       confidence building 

            b)       class discussions

            c)       speeches

            d)       verbal interaction

            3)       Advanced reading comprehension: using  texts dealing with science, literature and human rights (as per HEC recommendation.)

            4)       Précis writing :

            a)       rules of précis writing

            b)       practice précis.

            5)       Controlled & guided writing :

                   a)   pre writing (planning, information gathering, preparing to write)

                   b)   writing

                   c)   search for topic sentences

                   d)   developing a theme

                   e)   following up ideas and arguments

                   f)   outline plans etc.

            6)       Essay writing :

                   a)   Types of writing – narrative, descriptive, expository, argumentative etc.

                   b)   Using guided writing to organize essays.

            c)       Including human rights as essay topics (as per HEC recommendation).

            7)       Writing short reports:

            a)       short background of report and its importance

            b)       memo report

            c)       brief reports on events seen / experienced like visit to an exhibition etc. 

            8)       Letter writing:

            a)       format and layout

            b)       formal letters

            c)        types of letters – invitations (acceptance and refusals), condolence, thanks, congratulations, to the editor, chairman class advisor, dean, vice chancellor etc.

            9)       Applied Grammar:

            a)       morphology

            b)       types of sentences

            c)       sentence analysis

            d)       tenses

            e)       jumbled sentences           

            f)        question tags

            g)       homonyms and homophones and their use in sentences 

            h)       punctuation – sentences and paragraphs

            i)         use of idioms

            Teaching Methodology:

            Lectures, Reading and writing activities, Discussions, Speaking activities like speeches and student to student interaction.

            Recommended Texts for the Book Bank

            Handouts.

            • Hooper J.S. A Quick English Reference , OUP 
            • Eastwood J. Oxford Practice Grammar , OUP
            • Langan, J., College Writing

            Reference Books/Magazines/Articles

            • Yorkey, Study Skills , McGraw Hill
            • Gartside, Business Correspondence , Pitman
            • Thomson & Martinet, College English Grammar , OUP
            • Murphy, Effective Business Communication, McGraw Hill
            • Lou Mary, Technical Communication, Irwin
            • Oshima Alice, Writing Academic English, Addison Wesley
            • Thoburn, McMillan English, McMillan
            • Aaron, Jane, The Little Brown Compact Handbook, Longman

             

            General Information

            Course Title : Pakistan Studies
            Code : HS-105
            Year : First Year
            Teaching Hours : 2-Credits / Semester          
            Pre-requisite :  
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)


             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course.

            • To introduce students to their past, especially with the history and ideology of Pakistan.
            • To provide knowledge and understanding of the present conditions, the problems, needs and requirements in different fields such as a system of government, geography and natural resources, industry, economy, social structure etc.
            • To instil in students a sense of belonging to Pakistan.
            • To promote of scholarly research regarding the problems and issues facing Pakistan.
            • To prepare them to be good and useful members of society.

            Course Contents.

            Chapter-1) Historical and ideological perspective of Pakistan Movement

            1. Two Nation Theory

            • Definition: Claim of Muslims of being a separate nation from Hindus, based upon cultural diversity.
            • Significance: Cultural diversity and interests led to the demand of Pakistan – Lahore resolution.

            2. Creation of Pakistan

            • Factors leading to the creation of Pakistan.
            • Quaid-e-Azam and the demand of Pakistan.

            Chapter-2) Land of Pakistan

            • Geo-physical conditions
            • Geo-political and strategic importance of Pakistan.
            • Natural resource, viz: mineral, water and power.

            Chapter-3) Constitutional Process

            • Early efforts to make a constitution (1947-1956) problems and issues.
            • Salient features of the constitution of 1956 and its abrogation.
            • Salient features of the constitution of 1962 and its abrogation.
            • Constitutional and political crisis of 1971.
            • Salient features of the constitution of 1973
            • Constitutional developments since 1973 to date with special reference to the amendments to the constitutions.

            Chapter-4) Contemporary issues in Pakistan

            • A brief survey of Pakistan Economy
            • An overview of current economic situation in Pakistan; problems, issues and future prospects.
            • Social Issues
              • Pakistani Society and Culture-Broad features
              • Citizenship: national and international
              • Literacy and education in Pakistan: problems and issues
              • State of Science and Technology in Pakistan: A comparison with other countries with special reference to the Muslim world

             

            • Environmental Issues
            • Environmental pollution and its hazards: causes, and solutions.
            • Environmental issues in Pakistan: government policies and measures and suggestions for improvement.
            • Pakistan’s role in the preservation of nature through international conventions / treaties.

             

            Chapter-5) Pakistan’s Foreign Policies

              • Evolution of Pakistan foreign policy-1947 to date
              • A brief survey of Relation with Neighbours, Super Powers & the Muslim World.

             

            Chapter-6) Human Rights

            • Conceptual foundations of Human Rights
            • What are Human Rights? Definition, origins & significance.
            • Comparative analysis of Islamic and Western Perspectives of Human rights.
            • UN System for protection Human Rights
              • UN Charter.
              • International Bill of Human Rights – an overview.
              • Implementation mechanism.
            • Other important international treaties and conventions
            • The convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against Women (CEDAW).
            • International convention on the rights of child (CRC)
            • Convention against torture (CAT).
            • Other treaties and Convention.
            • Pakistan’s response to Human Rights at national and international levels
            • Constitutional Provisions.
            • Pakistan’s Obligations to international treaties and documents.
            • Human Rights issues in Pakistan- a critical analysis
            • Pakistan’s stand on violation of Human Rights in the international perspective.

            Teaching Methodology

            • Lectures supplemented by presentations, quizzes, group discussion and interaction with the class, reading assignments, written assignments, reports etc.
            Recommended Text Book(s)  

            No textbook is recommende

             

            Reference Books / Magazines / Articles

            • Rafi Raza, Pakistan in Perspective 1947-1997
            • Sharif-ul-Mujahid, The Ideology of Pakistan
            • N. Sethi, The Environment of Pakistan
            • Ziring Lawrence, Pakistan in the Twentieth Century
            • Parvez Hoodbhoy, State and Education
            • Burke S. M. & Ziring Lawrence, Pakistan’s Foreign Policy
            • Dr. Ishrat Hussain, Pakistan - The Economy of an Elitist State
            • Pakistan Almanac

            General Information

            Course Title : Pakistan Studies for Foreign Students (Alternate Course)
            Code : HS-127
            Year : First Year
            Teaching Hours : 2-Credits / Semester          
            Pre-requisite :  
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (70 theory, 30 sessional)

             

             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course

            • To acquaint students with the history of creation of Pakistan.
            • To provide them basic knowledge about Pakistan
            • To develop their interest in Pakistan by highlighting common features in the fields of culture, language, literature and foreign affairs.

            Contents

            Chapter 1 – Land of Pakistan
            • Land & People
            • Strategic importance
            • Important beautiful sights
            • Natural resources.

            Chapter 2 - A brief Historical background:

            • A brief Historical survey of Muslim community in the sub-continent.
            • British rule & its impacts
            • Indian re-action
            • Two nation theory – Origin &  development
            • Factors leading towards the demand of a separate Muslim state.
            • Creation of Pakistan           

            Chapter 3 - Government & Politics in Pakistan:

            • Constitution of Pakistan – A brief outline.
            • Governmental structure – Federal & Provincial.
            • Local Government Institutions.
            • Political History – A brief account.
            Chapter 4 – Pakistan & the Muslim World:
            • Relations with the Muslim countries.

            Chapter 5 – Language and Culture:

              • Origins of Urdu Language.
              • Influence of Arabic & Persian on Urdu Language & Literature.
              • A short history of Urdu literature.

             

            Teaching Methodology:
            Lectures, group discussion

            Recommended Text Book (s)
            No text book recommended.

             
            Reference Books / Magazines / Articles

            • Ikram Rabbani, Pakistan Affairs 
            • Victoria Schofield, Old Roads - New Highways 50 years of Pakistan 


            General Information

            Course Title : Islamic Studies
            Code : HS-205
            Year : Second Year
            Teaching Hours : 2-Credits / Term         
            Pre-requisite :  
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (75 theory, 25 sessional)


             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course

            • To enhance the religious knowledge in more informative and comprehensive way.
            • To create interest towards Shariah, Quran & Hadith.
            • To assist in character building & to develop Islamic approach & thinking amongst the students, and develop the habit of finding solutions of daily life problems through Quran and Sunnah.
            • Correct reading of given verses & Ahadith, their meaning and message.
            • Biography of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) highlighting his status as a guide to mankind.
            • Introduction of Islamic civilization and a brief history of its impacts on world.


            Contents


            Section-A: Quranic Verses

            Chapter 01

            • Tauheed: Al-Ambiya-22, Al-Baqarah - 163&164.
            • Prophet Hood: Al-Imran-79, Al –Huda-7, Al-Maida0h-3.
            • Here-After: Al –Baqarah-48, and one Hadith.

             
            Chapter 02 

            • Basic Islamic Practices: Al-Mu’ minun-1-11, and  two Ahadith

             
            Chapter 03

            • Amer-Bil-Ma‘Roof  Wa-Nahi Anil Munkar:
              • the concept of Good & Evil,
              • Importance and necessity of  Da’wat-e-Deen Al- Imran – 110
              • Method of Da’wat-e-Deen An-Nehl-125, Al-Imran-104, and two Ahadith

            Chapter 04

            • Unity of the Ummah:   Al-Imran-103, Al-Hujurat-10, Al-Imran-64, Al-An’ am –108, and two Ahadith.

            Chapter 05 

            • Kasb-e-Halal: Ta ha-81, Al- A’raf-32-33, Al-Baqarah-188, and two Ahadith.

            Chapter 06

            • Haquq-ul-Ibad: Protection of life Al-Maidah-32
              • Right to Property Al-Nisa-29
              • Right to Respect & Dignity Al-Hujurat -11-12
              • Freedom of Expression: Al-Baqarah-256
              • Equality: Al-Hujurat-13
              • Economic Security: Al-Ma’arij-24-25
              • Employment Opportunity on Merit: An-Nisa-58
              • Access to Justice: An- Nisa-135

             
            Chapter 07

            • Women’s Rights: An-Nehl-97, Al-Ahzab-35, An-Nisa -07

            Chapter 08

            • Relations with Non-Muslims: Al-Mumtahanah-8-9,  Al-Anfa’al-61 and The last Sermon of Hajj of Holy Prophet (PBUH): Relevant extracts

            Section B:

            Chapter 09

            • Seerat (life) of the Holy Prophet (PBUH): 
              • Birth
              • life at Makkah
              • declaration of prophet hood
              • preaching & its difficulties
              • migration to Madina
              • brotherhood (Mawakhat) & Madina Charter
              • The Holy Wars of the Prophet (Ghazwat-e-Nabawi)
              • Hujjat-ul-Wida
              • The last sermon of Khutbatulwida: Translation and important points

            Section C:

            Chapter 10

            • Islamic Civilization:
            • In the sub continent: pre- Islamic civilizations. The political, social & moral impacts of Islamic civilization.
            • In the world: academic, intellectual, social & cultural impact of Islam on the world.

             
            Teaching Methodology:

              • Lectures, assignments, viva-voce, general discussion & participation of student.

            Recommended Text Book(s)

              • Dr. Saeedullah Qazi: Thematic study of Holy Quran & Hadith, NED University.

            Reference Books / Magazines / Articles

            • Dr. Mohsin Khan & Dr. Taqi uddin Hilali, The Nobel Quran (Quranic Translation)
            • Safi ur Rehman Mubarakpuri, The Sealed Nectar: A book on the biography of Holy Prophet (PBUH)
            • Israr ul Rehman Bukhari, Islam Kay Karhai Nomayan: A book on Islamic Civilization.
            • Tafseer Ibn-e-Kaseer  (English Translation)
            • Tafseer Abdul Majid Darya Abadi (English)
            • Qazi Suleman Mansoor Puri, Rehmat-ul-Lilalameen
            • Arshad Bhatti, Mutaliah Tahzeeb- e- Islam




            General Information

            Course Title : Ethical Behaviour (Alternate Course for Non Muslim Students) 
            Code : HS-209
            Year : Second Year
            Teaching Hours : 2-Credits / Term         
            Pre-requisite :  
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (75 theory, 25 sessional)


             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course

            • To highlight the importance of Ethics in Human life.
            • To acquaint students with different Ethical philosophies.
            • To encourage them to apply Ethical values in their personal and collective lives.


            Contents

            1. Introduction to Ethics:
            • Definition of Ethics
            • Definition between normative and positive science
            • Problem of freewill
            • Method of Ethics
            • Uses of Ethics

            2. Ethical Theories:

            • History of Ethics: Greek Ethics, Medieval, Modern Ethics
            • Basic concept of right and wrong: good and evil
            • Utilitarianism, hedonism, self-realization: egoism, intuitionism, rationalism  
            • Kant’s moral philosophy

             
            3. Ethics & Religion:

            • The relation of Ethics to religion
            • Basic ethical principles of major religions: Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, Islam
            4. Ethics, Society, and moral theory:
            • Ethical foundation of Rights and Duties
            • Applied Ethics
            • Society as the background of moral life
            • Universalism and Altruism
            • Theories of punishment

            Teaching Methodology:

              • Lectures, group discussion


            Recommended Text Book(s)

              • Lillie W., An Introduction to Ethics, Reprinted in 1974
              • Warburton N., Philosophy: the Basic, Routledge, London


            Reference Books / Magazines / Articles

            • Dar B. Ahmed, Quranic Ethics, Institute of Islamic Culture, Lahore
            • Singer P., A Companion to Ethics, Black Well, USA



            General Information

            Course Title : Business Communication & Ethics
            Code : HS-304 / HS-208 for SCIT
            Year : Third Year / Second Year (SCIT)
            Teaching Hours : 3-Credits / Term               
            Pre-requisite : Good English Language Skills
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (75 theory, 25 sessional)

             

             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course

            • To enable students to understand and communicate both orally and in writing in a work environment.
            • To help the students understand various ethical positions on business / work issues.
            • To train them as good and efficient communicators.

            Contents

            • Communication Skills (oral):  
            • Definitions and Conditions,
            • Modes: verbal, non-verbal, vocal, non-vocal, sender, Receiver, en-coding, decoding, noise, context, emotional maturity, relationships, etc.
            • Language, perception, 
            • Non-verbal, body language, physical appearance, cultural differences etc.
            • Personal and interpersonal skills / perceptions.
            • Communication dilemmas and problems
            • Public Speaking – speaking situation, persuasion,
            • Making presentations,
            • Interviews
            • Business Writing:
              • Formal / Business letters, e-mails: a) job applications and resumes/ cv, b) enquiries, c) complaints / adjustments, d) orders, e) quotations, f) banking etc.
              • Memos: layout, language, style
              • Meeting management: notice, agenda, conducting / participating, writing minutes.
              • Contracts and agreements (basic theoretical knowledge and comprehension),
              • Research / scientific reports : types, structure, layout / presentation, writing process etc.
              • Tenders (basic theoretical knowledge and comprehension)

             

            • Engineering / Business Ethics: 
            • Need and objectives for code of ethics and its importance
            • Type of ethics, involvement and impact in daily life
            • Problems / conflicts / dilemmas in application (case studies)
            • Sexual Harassment / discrimination in the workplace
              • why it occurs,
              • myths   regarding   sexual harassment,
              • how to deal with it,
              • gender equality,
              • respect etc.               

            Codes of conduct:

            • Pakistan Engineering Council
            • Code for Gender Justice,
            • Brief study of other codes of conduct.
            Teaching Methodology
              • Lectures: interspersed with interactive sessions in class
              • Practical work:  spoken language, pronunciation, accent reduction, discussion etc.

             Recommended Texts
            No one textbook is recommended

            Reference Books / Magazines / Articles / Handouts

            • Lesikar & Pettit, Report writing for Business, McGraw Hill
            • Roach, Gant & Allyn Perrigo & Bacon, Business and Professional Communication
            • Guffey, Mary (2007), Business Communication, Thomson
            • Bovee & Thill, Business Communication Essentials, Prentice Hall
            • Burton & Dimbleby, Teaching Communication, Routledge
            • Boatright J., Ethics and the Conduct of Business, Prentice Hall
            • Ashley A., Handbook of Commercial Correspondence, ELBS
            • Flederman, Engineering Ethics, McGraw Hill
            • Wheatley Doris, Report writing, Penguin
            • Osborne & Motley, Improving Communication, Houghton / Mifflin

             

            General Information

            Course Title : Business Communication & Medical Ethics
            Code : HS-404
            Year : Fourth Year (Bio-Medical Engineering)
            Teaching Hours : 3-Credits / Term               
            Pre-requisite : Good English Language Skills
            Marks/Distribution

            100 (75 theory, 25 sessional)

             

             

             

             

             

             

            Objectives of the Course

            • To understand oral and written communication
            • To communicate as good and efficient communicators
            • To become sensitive to central, moral, philosophical, and social issues in medicine and health policy
            • To gain critical skills for evaluating the moral and philosophical claims, arguments, and goals in medicine
            • To formulate, present, and defend a particular position on moral issues in health care

            Course Contents
            Oral Communication Skills:

            • Definitions conditions and processes
            • Communication modes: verbal and non-verbal
            • Language and perception
            • Body language and non-verbal communication
            • Interpersonal skills
            • Communication barriers
            • Public speaking and presentations
            • Interviews

            Written Communication Skills:

            • Types of messages: Writing business messages (e-mails, job applications, resumes, good news / bad news, letters, routine messages etc.)
            • Memos
            • Management of meetings
            • Contracts and agreements
            • Tender notices.

            Report Writing:

            • Research / scientific reports (structure, layout, writing process etc.)

            Introduction to General and Medical ethics:

            • Need and objectives for code of ethics and its importance
            • Codes of conduct – PEC code, codes for gender, justice
            • Other international codes e.g. Nuremburg, Helsinki, etc
            • Types of ethics, their involvement and impact in one’s daily life
            • Whistle blowing
            • Confidentiality.

            Current ethical issues in Bio-Medical Engineering practice:

            • Problems / conflict / dilemmas in application e.g. bio-medical case studies
            • Major ethical issues in bio-medical engineering practice: human subject research, stem cell research, death and dying, euthanasia, conflicts of interest, confidentiality, cloning etc
            • Sexual harassment / discrimination

            Recommended Books (Business Communication & Medical Ethics)

              • Fremgen, Bonnie F., Medical Law & Ethics, 3rd Ed. 2008, Prentice Hall
              • Guffey, Mary Ellen (2007), Business Communication, Thomson
              • Hope T. Medical Ethic: a very short introduction, 2004, Oxford University Press
              • Lesikar and Pettit, Improving Communication, McGraw Hill
              • Roach, Gant and Perrigo, Business & Professional Communication, Allyn and Bacon
              • Rosamond and Rhodes, Francis Leslie P. and Anita Silvers, Medical Ethics, 1st Ed. 2007, Blackwell Publishers
              • Vallero Daniel A., Biomedical Ethics for Engineers, 1st Ed. 2007, Elsevier

            Online Resources:

            Ethical principles: http://peds.ufl.edu/ethics_course/Ethics,%20Ethical20 Principles.htm